Publications

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Peer Reviewed Journals

Billingsley, B., Brock, R., Taber, K. S., & Riga, F. (2016). How Students View the Boundaries Between Their Science and Religious Education Concerning the Origins of Life and the Universe. Science Education, n/a-n/a. doi:10.1002/sce.21213
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sce.21213/pdf

Billingsley, B. (2016). Ways to prepare future teachers to teach science in multicultural classrooms. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 11(2), 283-291. doi:10.1007/s11422-015-9701-9
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11422-015-9701-9

Taber, K. S., Billingsley, B., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2015). English secondary students’ thinking about the status of scientific theories: consistent, comprehensive, coherent and extensively evidenced explanations of aspects of the natural world–or just ‘an idea someone has’. Curriculum Journal, 26(3), 370-403.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09585176.2015.1043926

Billingsley, B., Riga, F., Taber, K. S., & Newdick, H. (2014). Secondary school teachers’ perspectives on teaching about topics that bridge science and religion. Curriculum Journal, 25(3), 372-395. doi:10.1080/09585176.2014.920264
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sce.21213/pdf

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2013). Secondary school students’ epistemic insight into the relationships between science and religion—a preliminary enquiry. Research in Science Education, 43(4), 1715-1732.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11165-012-9317-y

Taber, K. S., Billingsley, B., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). Secondary students’ responses to perceptions of the relationship between science and religion: Stances identified from an interview study. Science Education, 1-26. doi:10.1002/sce.20459
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sce.20459/full

Taber, K. S., Billingsley, B., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). To what extent do pupils perceive science to be inconsistent with religious faith? An exploratory survey of 13-14 year-old English pupils. Science Education International, 22(2), 99-118.
http://www.icaseonline.net/sei/june2011/p2.pdf

Billingsley, B., Taber, K., Riga, F. & Newdick, H. (2011) Teaching and learning about the relationships between science and religion. Science Teacher Education, 62, 16-30.

Book chapters and co-authored books

Billingsley, B., Nassaji, M., Costa, A., & Chappell, K. (2016). What do teenagers believe about the soul? Findings from a survey and interview study with upper secondary school students. In N. Spurway (Ed.), Science and Religion Forum 40th Anniversary Book. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge scholar publishing.

Billingsley, B. (2013). Students’ Perceptions of Apparent Contradictions Between Science and Religion: Creation Is Only the Beginning Science Education for Diversity (pp. 329-338): Springer.

Billingsley, B., Butler, R., Lees, D., Lynn, W., Sally Morris, Saunders, N., & Sloane, N. (2008). Go Science Pupil Book. Oxford: Pearson.

Billingsley, B. (2000). Children’s Images of Scientists: Stereotypes. In P. Fensham & R. Cross (Eds.), Science and the citizen for educators and the public (pp. 79-85). Melbourne: Melbourne: Arena.

Professional Publications

Hatcher, C., Billingsley, B. (2015). Effective Strategies for Teaching Evolution: The Primary Evolution Project. Primary Science, 25-26.

Billingsley, B. (2014). Friends, rivals or pen pals? Thinking creatively about the relationships between science and religion. RE Ideas, 24-25.

Billingsley, B. (2014). What’s the one thing you should know about evolution? Primary Science, 32-33,

Taber, K. S., Billingsley, B., & Riga, F. (2012). Thinking about Big Questions’: a website to support teaching about How Science Works. Education in Science, 16-17.

Conference and Seminar Presentations

Billingsley, B., & Newall, E. (2017). Primary School Teachers Attitudes Towards Teaching Evolution: Findings from a Survey. Paper presented at the ASE (Association for Science Education) Annual Conference, Birmingham.

Billingsley, B., & Chappell, K. (2017). Secondary students’ understanding of genetics, personality and behaviour. Paper presented at the ASE (Association for Science Education) Annual Conference, Reading.

Billingsley, B., Coath, M., & Nassaji, M. (2016). Can a robot hear or only respond to a sound: Pushing the boundaries of robot sensory systems Paper presented at the BERA (British Education Research Association) annual conference), Leeds.

Billingsley, B., & Abedin, M. (2016). Primary children’s perspectives on questions that bridge science and religion: findings from a survey study in England. Paper presented at the BERA (British Education Research Association) annual conference), Leeds.

Billingsley, B., & Newall, E. (2016). Primary school teachers’ attitudes to teaching evolution and inheritance: Findings from a survey in England. Paper presented at the ASE (Association for Science Education) annual conference, Reading.

Billingsley, B., Newall, E., & Knapp, Z. (2016). An evaluative Study of teaching and learning resources supporting dialogue and debate on food issues — authentic science versus curriculum obstacles Paper presented at the BERA (British Education Research Association) annual conference), Leeds.

Billingsley, B., & Chappell, K. (2016). All in Your Genes? An investigation into secondary school teachers’ and students’ reasoning about human personality and behaviour. Paper presented at the ERIDOB (European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, Karlstad, Sweden.

Billingsley, B., & Chappell, K. (2016). Can, would and should a robot ever fall in love: developing students’ appreciation of why there are questions that cannot be answered by science. Paper presented at the Words beyond words: Inspiring religious literacy – A joint conference between NATRE, AULRE and AREIAC, Blackburn.

Billingsley, B., & Chappell, K. (2016). What are young people’s perceptions of power and limitations of science in the context of thinking about what it means to be human? Paper presented at the BERG (Biology Education Research Group – Royal Society of Biology) annual conference, London.

Billingsley, B., Nassaji, M., & Abedin, M. (2016). Can science tell us everything about being human? Research based intervention to teach secondary students about the nature of scientific questions. Paper presented at the TEAN (Teacher Education Advancement Network), Birmingham.

Billingsley, B., Nassaji, M., & Chappell, K. (2016). Troubled souls: Why teenagers are ambivalent about what it means to be human. Paper presented at the BERA (British Education Research Association) annual conference, Leeds.

Billingsley, B., Borgeaud, J., & Knapp, Z. (2016). Teaching Science and Religion: Student Teacher Perceptions Paper presented at the Values and Education, Winchester.

Billingsley, B. (2016). Developing school students’ appreciation of the power and limitations of science: Research based intervention study Paper presented at the Science and Religion Forum, Birmingham.

Billingsley, B., & Borgeaud, J. (2015). Primary schoolchildren’s perception and understanding of the relationship between science and religion on miracles. Paper presented at the AULRE annual conference, Twickenham.

Billingsley, B., & Nassaji, M. (2015). Ways to engage school students in big questions. Paper presented at the Science and Religion: Celebrating the Dialogue and Exploring the Future, St John’s College, Durham.

Billingsley, B., & Nassaji, M. (2015). What are teenagers’ perceptions of the power and limits of science when they consider what it means to be human? Paper presented at the Institute of Education Seminar Programme, Reading.

Billingsley, B. (2013). Students’ reasoning about personhood, being human and the soul. Paper presented at The Bristol Theological College, Seminar Programme., Bristol.

Billingsley, B. (2012). Divorce, common ground and talk of truce: Science and RE teachers’ perceptions of teaching about themes that bridge science and religion. Paper presented at the UK Science Education Research Conference – researchers sharing with researchers, York.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). Secondary school pupils’ thinking about the relationships between science and religion: conundrums. Paper presented at the ESERA (European Science Education Research Association) Biennial conference,, Lyons.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). Teaching and learning about science and religion. Paper presented at the ASE (Association for Science Education) Annual Conference, Reading.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). Is science a belief?: Classrooms, controversy and contradictions. Paper presented at the EARLI (European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction) Biennial conference, Exeter.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2011). “One day, we may be able to explain the whole universe using science alone”: A study to explore pupils’ ideas about the limitations of science. Paper presented at the Education in a Post Secular Society Conference; The British Education Research Association and the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, Canterbury.

Billingsley, B., & Riga, F. (2010). Secondary school pupils’ reasoning on science and religion. Paper presented at the ASE (Association for Science Education) Annual Conference, Nottingham.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2010). Teachers’ perspectives on collaborative teaching about the ‘Big Questions’ in secondary schools: The silent treatment. Paper presented at the Annual conference of the British Educational Research Association, Warwick.

Billingsley, B., Taber, K. S., Riga, F., & Newdick, H. (2010). The teaching of science and religion in secondary schools. Paper presented at the UCET (Universities’ Council for the Training of Teachers) annual conference, Leicestershire.

Billingsley, B. (2010). Secondary school pupils’ thinking about Apparent Contradictions between science and religion. Paper presented at the Association of Tutors in Science Education (ATSE) Annual Conference, Manchester.

PhD Thesis

Billingsley, B. (2004). Ways of Approaching the Apparent Contradictions between Science and Religion. (PhD), University of Tasmania.